Abila

Along with Philadelphia, Gerasa, Pella, Gadara, Kanatha, Dion, Scythopolis and Damascus, Abila made up part of the Decapolis, a ten-city Greco-Roman federation southeast of the Sea of Galilee in Jordan providing a strategic defence post protecting the eastern front of the Roman Empire.

It was occupied in the Bronze Age around 6,000 years ago to approximately 1500 AD (although an earthquake in 747AD turned much of the thriving city into rubble) and even though the site fell to ruin, there have been some spectacular discoveries. Archaeologists have painstakingly uncovered Byzantine churches, a monastic complex from the early Islamic period, Roman baths, a theatre, temples used to worship Herakles, Tyche and Athena, miles of subterranean water tunnels, aqueducts, megalithic columns, tombs, city gates and various municipal buildings.

Abila has been excavated extensively for almost 40 years but it remains one of the most exciting sites in the region for two reasons. Firstly so much is yet to be excavated and secondly much of what the resident archaeologists want to dig up is already visible from the surface, teasing them. It is close to the village of Quwayliba and on the bus from Irbid – the nearest sizable town – ask the driver to drop you off at the ruins.


Census records can tell you a lot of little known facts about your Segura - Abila ancestors, such as occupation. Occupation can tell you about your ancestor's social and economic status.

There are 3,000 census records available for the last name Segura - Abila. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Segura - Abila census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 642 immigration records available for the last name Segura - Abila. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name Segura - Abila. For the veterans among your Segura - Abila ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 3,000 census records available for the last name Segura - Abila. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Segura - Abila census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 642 immigration records available for the last name Segura - Abila. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name Segura - Abila. For the veterans among your Segura - Abila ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


History

Alyson and Michael went to high school together not much is known about this other than that he helped her get through that period in her life. During their high school years Alyson and Michael planned on going to a theater camp together, but Alyson was told by Eddy that she didn't get in.

In high school, Michael he dated a guy but had to keep quiet about it and hide his sexuality. 2011 was a very rough year for Michael. He might not have survived had his uncle not taken him to the JCE where Michael found a loving and supportive community where he no longer had to hide who he was.

Michael is a part of the local Tlingit community, and is dedicated to the traditional dance group in the area. Alyson confirms that he has been helping with planning a potlach with the clan. He is part of the Raven moiety, Octopus clan, which Chief Eddy is also a member.


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There is ample evidence of Jewish presence in the region, such as an ancient synagogue discovered in nearby Jerash. But in 36 years of excavations at Tell al-Abila, also known as Selukeia, no traces of Jews living in the Roman trading hub had been found before.

The depiction of the seven-branched menorah, with a branching three-legged base, was found on a stone in the second tier of a wall, near the floor, while excavating a Byzantine church from the 6th or 7th century CE.

“This is the first physical evidence of a Jewish presence at Abila, and holds great promise that further discoveries will give more evidence in this direction,” Dave Vila, head of the excavations, told Haaretz.

The stone block with the menorah carving was almost certainly not in situ, but was repurposed from another structure, probably a synagogue. Since it was not found in situ, meaning in its original site, the date of the menorah cannot be ascertained. But it has to predate the construction of the church, which is about 1300 to 1400 years old.

Search for the synagogue from which it may have come is underway. If none is found, that doesn't mean there wasn't one. Reuse of one block could indicate that all the material in the Jewish buildings of Abila was reused over the centuries.

Aerial view of Tell al-Abila, showing columns in the remains of a basilica. Simon Noel Rutter / Aerial Photographic Archive for Archaeology in the Middle East

The excavation of the church in which the menorah was discovered found evidence of use going back thousands of years, from a Roman bath complex underneath it, on top of which an earlier Byzantine church was built that has been discovered below the current one, to later Muslim occupation.

“There is a strong possibility that the church was used as a place of Muslim prayer – a musalla – before the earthquake that destroyed the whole structure in 749CE,” Vila told Haaretz. in fact, the quake destroyed Abila entirely. (The same happened to ancient Beit She'an.)

Elsewhere in Tell al-Abila, the archaeologists uncovered a Byzantine marketplace , and a Muslim grave from the Crusader Era, dating to around the 11th century CE. The burial is currently being studied.

Abila of the Decapolis

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The ancient ruins of Abila (from the Semitic word "abel" for watercourse) lie on the modern border of Jordan and Syria, near the Yarmuk River.

According to some sources, at least, Abila was one of the towns that made out the federation known as the Decapolis, a league of cities that existed around the second century C.E.

The word Decapolis comes from the Greek deka, meaning “ten,” and polis, “city”, but actually Ptolemy for example names 18 cities as in the “Decapolis,” which may indicate that the name came to be used in a general way, and that the number of cities varied. Which cities were the original ten is not clear. Some scholars would put Abila, listed by Ptolemy, in place of Raphana as among them.

One version of the ancient Decapolis. Nichalp, Wikimedia Commons

The term “Decapolis” first appears in the writings of Josephus and Pliny the Elder (both of the first century C.E.), and in Christian Greek scriptures. While acknowledging that some difference of opinion already existed, Pliny listed the following cities as among the original ten: Damascus, Philadelphia, Raphana, Scythopolis, Gadara, Hippo (Hippos), Dion, Pella, Galasa (Gerasa), and Canatha.

It seems evident, at any rate, that the Decapolis region did not have precisely defined boundaries, and that the authority of the Decapolis cities did not embrace all the intervening territory, but applied only to the district of each particular city.

In any case, the common purpose of the Decapolis, which was located south of the Sea of Galilee, was to protect mutual trade interests and also to defend against anti-Hellenistic forces within Palestine and aggressive nomadic tribes in the desert regions. The only Decapolis city west of the Jordan River, in today's Israel, is Beit She'an, known in antiquity as Scythopolis.

The ruins of Beit She’an, which attest to Israel’s history of catastrophic quakes. Michael Jacobson

The menorah

Depictions of the Jewish menorah with a tripod base were popular in late antique Judaism (fourth–sixth centuries C.E.). This can be seen clearly on the mosaic floors of several synagogues, for instance in Hammath Tiberias, Beit She'an, Beit Alpha and Nirim, not to mention on inscribed plaques, oil lamps and even a tiny gold ring from the fifth century C.E.

One of the oldest symbols in Judaism, the menorah has remained an enduring symbol of the Jewish people for millennia. The first known menorah is believed to have been made for the Tabernacle and is mentioned in the Bible (Exodus 25:31-40, 37:17-24).

Later, King Solomon had ten golden lampstands and a number of silver lampstands made for Temple use. A seven-branched candelabra stood in the Second Temple in Jerusalem and was brought by the Titus to Rome as spoils of war after the conquest of Jerusalem in year 70 CE. And in the ultimate testimony to the symbolism of the menorah as representative of the Jewish people, the Arch of Titus in Rome depicts Roman soldiers carrying booty from the Second Temple on their shoulders – prominently including that seven-branched candelabra.

Ariel view of the north area of Tell al-Abila, showing the remains of the Byzantine church. David Leslie Kennedy / Aerial Photographic Archive for Archaeology in the Middle East


Excavation Area

Abila of the Decapolis is divided into several distinct "Areas," which comprise the modern archaeological site. These Areas are distinguished by their location and special architectural surface features.

Area A&ndashByzantine Church, Area AA&ndashDeep Probe, Area B&ndashByzantine Monastic Complex/&ldquoTheater Cavea&rdquo, Area C&ndashBath Complex, Area D&ndash Byzantine Church, Area DD&ndashByzantine Church, Area E&ndashByzantine Church


Ramón Ábila stats and transfer history

The profile page of Ramón Ábila displays all matches and competitions with statistics for all the matches he played in. You can get most important stats of Ramón Ábila , including average player rating, goals, assists, cards and other relevant data are also displayed on AiScore.

AiScore Player value for Ramón Ábila is € 4.0M. He has a contract with Minnesota United FC until 30 Jun 2020. Ramón Ábila's jersey number is 9. Ramón Ábila is 32 years old,birstday is 1989/10/14 UTC, and he is 180 cm tall and 88 kg. Ramón Ábila prefers to play with Right foot.

Ramón Ábila previous match for Minnesota United FC was against Real Salt Lake in United States Major League Soccer, and the match ended with result 1:1 ( won the match). And his team is going to play their next match on -, - vs - in United States Major League Soccer. If Ramón Ábila is going to be in Minnesota United FC lineup, it will be confirmed on AiScore one hour before the match starts.

Ramón Ábila Transfer History and Transfer Fee
2021/04/06 UTC, From Boca Juniors To Minnesota United FC, - transfer fee.
2017/12/31 UTC, From CA Huracan To Boca Juniors, - transfer fee.
2017/08/08 UTC, From Boca Juniors To CA Huracan, - transfer fee.
2017/08/07 UTC, From Cruzeiro To Boca Juniors, € 1.25M transfer fee.
2016/06/23 UTC, From CA Huracan To Cruzeiro, € 3.5M transfer fee.
2013/12/01 UTC, From Instituto To CA Huracan, - transfer fee.


Trending Support Topics

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Year-End Topics

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Download / Installation / Technical

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What Abila family records will you find?

There are 12,000 census records available for the last name Abila. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Abila census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 184 immigration records available for the last name Abila. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the UK, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 495 military records available for the last name Abila. For the veterans among your Abila ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 12,000 census records available for the last name Abila. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Abila census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 184 immigration records available for the last name Abila. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the UK, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 495 military records available for the last name Abila. For the veterans among your Abila ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


Watch the video: YORE MAKELO RACHRUOK E NYUOL - Abila (January 2022).