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John Tyler is inaugurated as 10th president

John Tyler is inaugurated as 10th president

On April 6, 1841, John Tyler is sworn in as president. Tyler was elected as William Harrison’s vice president earlier in 1841 and was suddenly thrust into the role of president when Harrison died one month into office. He was the first vice president to immediately assume the role of president after a sitting president’s untimely exit and set the precedent for succession thereafter.

READ MORE: Why John Tyler May Be the Most Reviled U.S. President Ever

Tyler was a proponent of states’ rights and the perpetuation of slavery, and as such was a threat to his own political party, the Whigs, who advocated a strong federal system. When Tyler vetoed his fellow Whigs’ attempt to reestablish the National Bank, most of his cabinet resigned and he was thrown out of the Whig Party. As he had previously alienated the support of the Democrats by denouncing Andrew Jackson’s policies, Tyler became a president without a party who received death threats from both sides and earned the enmity of Congress. His four years in office were contentious, though he is credited with settling Canadian border disputes with Britain and beginning the annexation of Texas.

In 1844, during a cruise down the Potomac aboard the newly commissioned steam frigate USS Princeton, Tyler himself narrowly escaped death. The ship’s state-of-the-art cannon, called the Peacemaker, exploded when the crew fired a celebratory salute, killing several people aboard, including two members of Tyler’s cabinet and his future wife’s father. Tyler’s unexpected ascendance to the presidency and the near-miss aboard the Princeton earned him the nickname of His Accidency.

After leaving the White House, Tyler tried to broker a peace convention between the North and South on the eve of the Civil War, but failed to reach an agreement with Abraham Lincoln on key issues. Denounced as a traitor by the North, Tyler fell in line with southern secessionists and, in 1861, was elected to the Confederate House of Representatives. He died in 1862.


John Tyler is inaugurated as 10th president - HISTORY

John Tyler bought this 1,200-acre plantation in 1842, when he was still serving as 10th president of the United States, and it was his retirement home from 1845 until his death in 1862. He expanded the original 1780 frame plantation house into one of the longest private residences in Virginia&mdash300 feet long but only one room deep. Tyler was the first vice president of the United States to succeed to the presidency and set an important precedent by claiming the full powers of that position. His major goal as president was the annexation of Texas, which occurred shortly after he left office. Expelled from the Whig Party that nominated him, he was the first president threatened with impeachment. He named his plantation &ldquoSherwood Forest&rdquo because he considered himself a political outlaw&mdashlike Robin Hood.

John Tyler was born in 1790 at Greenway plantation, only about three miles away from Sherwood Forest. He studied law and soon entered politics, serving in the Virginia legislature from 1811 to 1816. Elected to the United States House of Representative in 1816 as a Democratic Republican, he supported the proslavery, strict constructionist, and states&rsquo right positions that he would hold to for the rest of his career. After leaving the House, he returned to state politics, serving as governor from 1825-1827. Elected to the United States Senate in 1827, he backed Andrew Jackson for president but became increasingly dissatisfied with his policies. By 1836, he abandoned the Democratic Republican Party, resigning from the Senate and becoming at least a nominal Whig, though here again he disagreed with many of the party&rsquos policies. The Whig Party nominated him for vice president in 1840, with William Henry Harrison, to appeal to states&rsquo rights southerners. The pair known as &ldquoTippecanoe and Tyler too&rdquo shared a short time in office together. Harrison caught pneumonia on Inauguration Day and died a month later.

Tyler was only 51, the youngest president ever up to that point. Tyler was also the first vice president to reach the presidency. Although called &ldquoHis Accidency&rdquo by his opponents, he refused to serve as acting president, insisting on all the powers of a duly elected chief executive. Because he opposed many of the policies of the party that nominated him, his administration was an intensely controversial one. He vetoed many bills enacted by the congressional majority and was the first president ever to have his veto overridden. At one point, all but one of his cabinet members resigned. The Whigs expelled him from the party and considered impeachment, again for the first time. They pushed through a resolution of censure in the House of Representatives and even denied him money to maintain the White House.

Letitia Christian Tyler, the President's first wife, died in the White House in September 1842. A few months later, Tyler began courting 23-year-old Julia Gardiner, a beautiful and wealthy New Yorker. Their marriage in New York City on June 26, 1844, marked another first, the first president married while in office.

By this time, Tyler had already expanded the original plantation house. One and one-half story wings already existed on either side of the two and one-half-story main block. He added a covered hyphen to connect the east wing with an existing kitchen and laundry and built a new balancing west wing containing an office and ballroom, reportedly designed by Tyler for dancing the Virginia reel. The two wings created a long narrow house with a unified, symmetrical façade. The interior displays ornamental woodwork based on the pattern-book designs of Minard Lefever and fashionable Greek Revival details.

Remnants of the terraced gardens and lawns reportedly designed by New York landscape architect Andrew Jackson Downing survive on the 25-acre property. There are also over 80 varieties of trees including a gingko tree given to Tyler by Captain Matthew Perry, when he returned from the Orient in the 1850s.

Tyler concentrated on managing his plantation and raising his second family in the 1850s. In 1860, hoping to avoid a civil war, he worked to find a compromise. He presided over the Washington Peace Convention of 1861, but when this failed, he voted for secession at the Virginia Secession Convention. Elected to the Confederate Congress, Tyler died on January 18, 1862, before it assembled. During the Civil War, Tyler&rsquos widow and children left the estate to live with her family in New York. Following the war, Tyler's wife returned to Sherwood Forest to reclaim the plantation.

Sherwood Forest has been the continuous residence of members of the Tyler family since President Tyler purchased it in 1842. Restored in the 1970s, the house reflects the lifestyle of this mid-19th century presidential family.

The John Tyler Home, Sherwood Forest, at 14501 John Tyler Memorial Hwy., Charles City, VA has been designated a National Historic Landmark. Click here for the National Historic Landmark registration file: text and photos. The house is located 18 miles west of Williamsburg and 35 miles east of Richmond on Virginia Rte. 5. The grounds are open daily for self-guided tours from 9:00am to 5:00pm. Guided house tours are available by appointment. There is a fee for admission. Please call 804-829-5377 or visit the Sherwood Forest website.

Sherwood Forest has been documented by the National Park Service's Historic American Buildings Survey. The John Tyler Home is also featured in the National Park Service James River Plantations Travel Itinerary.


Contents

The 1840 United States presidential election was won by the Whig Party nominee, Harrison, with Tyler as his vice-presidential running mate. Harrison was inaugurated as the ninth president on March 4, 1841, but on March 26, 1841, he came down with a cold, with pneumonia and pleurisy then setting in. It was believed that Harrison's illness was directly caused by the bad weather at his inauguration on March 4 however, the illness did not arise until more than three weeks after the event. [1]

On April 1, Secretary of State Daniel Webster sent word of Harrison's illness to Vice President Tyler, who was at his home in Williamsburg, Virginia. Two days later, Richmond attorney James Lyons wrote with the news that the president had taken a turn for the worse, remarking that "I shall not be surprised to hear by tomorrow's mail that Gen'l Harrison is no more." [2] Tyler determined not to travel to Washington, not wanting to appear unseemly in anticipating the president's death. At dawn on April 5, Webster's son Fletcher, Chief Clerk of the State Department, arrived at Tyler's plantation with a letter from Webster, informing the new president of Harrison's death the morning before. [2]

President Tyler immediately packed a bag and headed towards Washington with one of his sons via the fastest conveyances then available (steamboat and train), arriving early in the morning of April 6, having made the 230-mile (370 km) journey in 21 hours. [2] He was greeted by a bipartisan group of dignitaries, including the entire Cabinet. A heated discussion followed as to what procedural steps should be taken in the aftermath of Harrison's death. While several sitting Presidents had experienced illness, none had previously died while in office. Some cabinet members held that no formal actions needed to be taken, as Tyler's right to take over as Acting President was virtually undisputed. During Harrison's illness, the executive branch was ruled by majority vote of cabinet officials. Tyler discontinued this practice, contending that taking the oath of office would ensure his authority as the tenth president of the United States. [3]

On April 6, 1841, William Cranch, Chief Judge of the United States Circuit Court of the District of Columbia, administered the oath to President Tyler in the lobby of the Brown's Indian Queen Hotel, making this the first extraordinary presidential inauguration in history. [4]

On April 9, Tyler published an inaugural message to a special session of Congress that Harrison had called. [5] Later presidents would do the same under similar circumstances.

Tyler's defense of his title was unyielding. [3] Letters addressed to the “vice president” or “acting president” were returned unopened. The “Tyler precedent” subsequently endured through the next seven presidential deaths, four after assassinations, until it was codified in 1967 when the Twenty-fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified.


6. He was expelled by the Whig Party

John Tyler was expelled from his Whig party on September 13, 1841, a few months after taking over the presidency. His unexpected accession to the presidency had greatly threated ambitions of Henry Clay and others who had an eye for the seat. Tyler further turned down a proposal by Henry Clay, his opponent, of not having the incumbent president challenging Clays’ nomination by the Whig party to the presidency in the 1844 elections. On the other hand, Tyler’s mode of operation was not always in line with the doctrines of the Whig party. Tyler vetoed many bills by the Whigs party because he found them either unconstitutional or infringed on the rights of the state. The party expelled Tyler after he failed to give in to their demands and resign.

Background information was that, following the death of President Harrison, Tyler took over under what many said was a constitutional crisis. He was expected to continue adhering to the policies of the Whig party like his predecessor Harrison. However, Tyler took his own method of governing the country. A notable case is on the issue of national banking Act where Tyler objected to the Act and proposed the exchequer. All the cabinet members that Tyler has inherited from Harrison resigned except one after he vetoed bills that were aimed at creating a new national bank. The orchestration by his opposers was to make Tyler vacate the office. The Whigs Congress, in a bid to frustrate Tyler, failed to allocate money to fix facilities in the White House. Tyler not only received assassination threats but the Whigs even tried unsuccessfully to impeach him in 1843.


GENEALOGY AND ANCESTRY OF JOHN TYLER, 10TH PRESIDENT

John Tyler was the first Vice President to ascend to the presidency upon the death of the President. He did not make an inaugural speech and was never elected President. During the Civil War, he was elected to the Confederate Congress. He had the most children of any President. He also started the tradition of the playing of "Hail to the Chief" when the President enters a room. His plantation home was named Sherwood Forest. John Tyler was born on March 29, 1790 in Charles City County, Virginia. His parents were Virginia Governor John Tyler and Mary Marot Armistead. John Tyler shares a common descent from Anthony Savage with presidents James Madison and Zachary Taylor. Anthony Savage, in turn, was descended from Charlemagne, William "the Conqueror" and various other English kings. John Tyler also shares a common ancestry from William Strother with presidents Zachary Taylor and Jimmy Carter. For a detailed family tree, see http://www.hull.ac.uk/php/cssbct/cgi-bin/gedlkup.php/n=presidents?presidents1685

10th President John Tyler… Most Reviled U.S. Presidents Ever

Following differences with President Andrew Jackson, Tyler left the Democratic Party and joined the rival Whig party.

As Harrison became the president, Tyler, deeming the vice president’s duties largely irrelevant, returned home to his Virginia plantation.

During his stay in Virginia, Tyler was given the news that Harrison had become the first American commander-in-chief to die in office, just 31 days after the inauguration.

Upon returning to the nation’s capital, Tyler took the presidential oath, which angered strict constructionists who argued that the Constitution only specified that, when a president died, the vice president would inherit presidential “powers and duties”—not the office itself.

Tyler made fun of Secretary of State Daniel Webster when he informed him that Harrison had agreed to abide by the majority decision of the cabinet on any policy matter—even if he was personally opposed.

“I can never consent to being dictated to,” he informed his cabinet. “I am the president, and I shall be responsible for my administration,” assuring that he would neither serve as an interim “acting president” nor carry out all of his predecessor’s agenda, which included re-establishment of a national bank and protective tariffs.

This act infuriated the Whig leaders, in particular Senator Henry Clay.

After he twice vetoed Clay’s bill to re-establish a national bank, supporters of the senator forced open the White House gates, hurled stones at the presidential mansion, shouting “Groans for the traitor!”

The Whigs expelled the president from the party and tried to evict him from the White House altogether after vetoing yet another one of their bills.

Former president John Quincy Adams wrote that the tenth president was “in direct violation both of the grammar and context of the Constitution,” and eight senators voted against a resolution recognizing him as the new president.

“Popularity, I have always thought, may aptly be compared to a coquette—the more you woo her, the more apt is she to elude your embrace,” the tenth president said.

Nonetheless, he failed to gain any popularity, as he succeeded only in alienating politicians on both sides of the aisle.

The New York Times described him as “the most unpopular public man that had ever held any office in the United States.”

Some of the tenth president’s successors didn’t think very highly of him either, as Harry Truman called him “one of the presidents we could have done without.”

“He has been called a mediocre man but this is unwarranted flattery,” Theodore Roosevelt said . “He was a politician of monumental littleness.”

C-SPAN’s 2017 Presidential Historians Survey ranked him in the bottom five presidents, along with Warren Harding, Franklin Pierce, Andrew Johnson and James Buchanan.

He died in 1862 due to health condition however, his death was the only one in presidential history not to be officially recognized in Washington, because of his allegiance to the Confederate States of America.


John Tyler is inaugurated as 10th president - HISTORY

John Tyler was the tenth United States President (1841-45). He was the first President born after the Constitution was adopted. He was a maverick Democrat who refused to truly give allegiance to any political party. He was the Vice President of William Henry Harrison and became President upon Harrison's death. This was the first time that the Succession Amendment had to be used.


John Tyler was born on March 29, l790, in Charles County, Virginia. He graduated from William and Mary College in 1807 and was admitted to the Virginia Bar in 1809, after which he began the practice of law. When he was twenty-one years old, Tyler was elected to the Virginia Legislature. He married Letitia Christian in 1813, and then went on to serve as captain of a militia in the War of 1812. In 1816, at the age of 26, he was elected to the US House of Representatives, where he served for four years before returning for a short time to the Virginia Legislature. Like his father, he served as Governor of Virginia. Two years after that, he was elected to the US Senate, where, for political reasons, he opposed Andrew Jackson's policies on states' rights and voted to censure the President. He had fifteen children the most of any President.


John Tyler was a consistent supporter of states' rights and favored a strict interpretation of the Constitution. This often put him in an awkward position. He actually resigned his Senate seat in 1836 rather than yield to his state legislature's position to reverse his censure vote on President Jackson.


In 1840 the Whigs nominated Tyler to run as William Henry Harrison's Vice President. Their memorable campaign slogan was "Tippecanoe and Tyler too!" A mere month after the inauguration, Harrison died of pneumonia. A President had never before died in office, so at William Henry Harrison's death, many thought Tyler should be merely an "acting President." He, however, firmly established the right of the Vice President to succeed completely to the presidency. He claimed all presidential rights and began his administration by vetoing a National Bank Bill. Being the first non-elected President, Tyler was widely resented and dubbed "His Accidency" by his political enemies. He was ridiculed in his day but is regarded today as a man of great courage.

In spite of his vote against Jackson, Tyler did believe in states' rights, and he vetoed two bills because of this belief. Fiercely independent, he would not support either party's program, infuriating everyone and bringing himself into great conflict with both Congress and his own cabinet. All but one of the members of the Cabinet resigned. He replaced them with people who believed in strong states' rights views. He was the first President that Congress ever tried to impeach. The effort was unsuccessful but in 1845 Tyler did become the first President to have a veto overridden by Congress.


Tyler was expelled from his own party. The Whigs and Democrats both refused to recognize him or his leadership. Despite the lack of support, he was able to establish a United States Weather Bureau and bring an end to the Second Seminole War in Florida. At the end of his term he had intended to seek the Presidential nomination, but the Democrats wanted James Polk. When Tyler returned to private life, he continued to defend states' rights, but stood firmly against secession and was a delegate to the Washington Peace Conference in 1861. After hearing Abraham Lincoln's inaugural address, however, Tyler changed his mind and urged Virginia to secede from the Union. Just prior to his death in November of 1861, he was elected to the Confederate House of Representatives.


Jonn Tyler: Confederate Congressman, Peace Delegate, and 10th President

John Tyler, tenth president of the United States, died January 18, 1862. Historians typically do not associate Tyler with the Civil War period. The Tyler presidency was often called an ‘accident’, and it is notable that Tyler’s Whig party expelled him during his presidency. The annexation of Texas was Tyler’s last, and probably most memorable, act in office. Tyler is best known for concessions during his presidency that later led to the Civil War. Although Tyler owned slaves, he believed the institution of slavery would end if left alone. “He had denounced the conception of slavery. His solution to its eventual disappearance, however, hinged on the theory of ‘dispersion” (Kleber 700). In addition to his presidency, Tyler became very active in Virginia and Confederate politics shortly before his death.

In hopes of saving the Union, Tyler petitioned Virginia to lead a peace conference in Washington in January 1861. On February 4 th , ironically the same day the Confederate States of America declared themselves a separate nation, Tyler convened with other state representatives in Washington. Since Virginia had not yet seceded, Tyler hoped his home state could lead the delegation in a peaceful resolution to the pre-Civil War activities. The Washington Peace Conference organized an agenda and took their findings to President Buchanan. Buchanan dismissed Tyler and stated he would leave the new problem of secession to his successor, Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln, too, was wary of the Conference. He confided in close friend Orville Browning that “no good results would come out of it” (Holzer). After Lincoln was inaugurated, the peace committee communicated with him directly. The delegation hoped the new president would negotiate compromise to keep the fragile peace, but Lincoln held firm to the notion that he was elected to defend the Union and the then recent assaults on it.

When Virginia seceded on April 17, 1861, shortly after the shots were fired at Fort Sumter, “Tyler threw his… support to the new confederacy” (Kleber 703). While Tyler had been urging peace in Washington earlier in 1861, he had also served in the provisional Confederate Congress. After the U.S. Senate and Lincoln rejected the Washington Peace Conference’s plan, Tyler urged Virginia to secede. He was elected to the Confederate House of Representatives. After moving to Richmond to fulfill his role in the new Confederate government, Tyler suffered a stroke. “Six days later he died” (Kleber 703) even before Tyler started his work as a Confederate Congressman.

John Tyler was a man of ‘firsts’. He was the first Vice President to become President after his predecessor died in office. Some even claim he was the first and only American president to die on foreign soil as he died in the Confederate States of America which were not part of the Union in 1862. He was also the founder of the Washington Peace Conference. A conference that, although was unsuccessful, hoped to alleviate the pressures of civil war. Lincoln stood in defiance to the group, not because he did not want peace, but because he knew, by 1861, the time for compromise was over.

Ms. James is a Historical Interpreter at President Lincoln’s Cottage.

Works Cited

Kleber, Louis C. “John Tyler.” History Today 25.10 (1975): 697. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 13 Jan. 2011.

Holzer, Harold. “Give Peace a Chance.” America’s Civil War 23.6 (2011): 44-49. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 13 Jan. 2011.


Jonn Tyler: Confederate Congressman, Peace Delegate, and 10th President

John Tyler, tenth president of the United States, died January 18, 1862. Historians typically do not associate Tyler with the Civil War period. The Tyler presidency was often called an ‘accident’, and it is notable that Tyler’s Whig party expelled him during his presidency. The annexation of Texas was Tyler’s last, and probably most memorable, act in office. Tyler is best known for concessions during his presidency that later led to the Civil War. Although Tyler owned slaves, he believed the institution of slavery would end if left alone. “He had denounced the conception of slavery. His solution to its eventual disappearance, however, hinged on the theory of ‘dispersion” (Kleber 700). In addition to his presidency, Tyler became very active in Virginia and Confederate politics shortly before his death.

In hopes of saving the Union, Tyler petitioned Virginia to lead a peace conference in Washington in January 1861. On February 4 th , ironically the same day the Confederate States of America declared themselves a separate nation, Tyler convened with other state representatives in Washington. Since Virginia had not yet seceded, Tyler hoped his home state could lead the delegation in a peaceful resolution to the pre-Civil War activities. The Washington Peace Conference organized an agenda and took their findings to President Buchanan. Buchanan dismissed Tyler and stated he would leave the new problem of secession to his successor, Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln, too, was wary of the Conference. He confided in close friend Orville Browning that “no good results would come out of it” (Holzer). After Lincoln was inaugurated, the peace committee communicated with him directly. The delegation hoped the new president would negotiate compromise to keep the fragile peace, but Lincoln held firm to the notion that he was elected to defend the Union and the then recent assaults on it.

When Virginia seceded on April 17, 1861, shortly after the shots were fired at Fort Sumter, “Tyler threw his… support to the new confederacy” (Kleber 703). While Tyler had been urging peace in Washington earlier in 1861, he had also served in the provisional Confederate Congress. After the U.S. Senate and Lincoln rejected the Washington Peace Conference’s plan, Tyler urged Virginia to secede. He was elected to the Confederate House of Representatives. After moving to Richmond to fulfill his role in the new Confederate government, Tyler suffered a stroke. “Six days later he died” (Kleber 703) even before Tyler started his work as a Confederate Congressman.

John Tyler was a man of ‘firsts’. He was the first Vice President to become President after his predecessor died in office. Some even claim he was the first and only American president to die on foreign soil as he died in the Confederate States of America which were not part of the Union in 1862. He was also the founder of the Washington Peace Conference. A conference that, although was unsuccessful, hoped to alleviate the pressures of civil war. Lincoln stood in defiance to the group, not because he did not want peace, but because he knew, by 1861, the time for compromise was over.

Image courtesy Library of Congress.

Ms. James is a Historical Interpreter at President Lincoln’s Cottage.

Works Cited

Kleber, Louis C. “John Tyler.” History Today 25.10 (1975): 697. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 13 Jan. 2011.

Holzer, Harold. “Give Peace a Chance.” America’s Civil War 23.6 (2011): 44-49. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 13 Jan. 2011.


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This week in honor of Memorial Day, each day we will be sharing a post about the popularity of naming after key figures in history. We have tried to stick as close to Marrowbone Creek as possibly with our inclusion of the names we felt were given for each of these great men. We hope you enjoy!

Day 2:
6th President: JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, Party: Federalist, then Democratic-Republican, then National Republican, then Anti-Masonic, then Whig. Served: 1825 – 1829 as Democrat-Republican.
Born: July 11, 1767 in Braintree (Quincy), Massachusetts to John Adams and Abigail Smith.
He began his diplomatic career as the U.S. minister to the Netherlands in 1794, and served as minister to Prussia during the presidential administration of his father, the formidable patriot John Adams. After serving in the Massachusetts State Senate and the U.S. Senate, the younger Adams rejoined diplomatic service under President James Madison, helping to negotiate the Treaty of Ghent (1814), which ended the War of 1812.
Died: Feb 23, 1848 in Washington, D.C.

Those named for JOHN QUINCY ADAMS:
• John Q. McGranaham, b. Dec 17, 1864 Lawrence Co, KY. Buried: Warfield, KY

7th President: ANDREW JACKSON, became the leader of the new Democratic Party. Served: 1829 – 1837.
“Old Hickory” was an undoubtedly strong personality, and his supporters and opponents would shape themselves into two emerging political parties: The pro-Jacksonites became the Democrats (formally Democrat-Republicans) and the anti-Jacksonites (led by Clay and Daniel Webster) were known as the Whig Party.
Born: March 15, 1767 in the Waxhaws region on the border of North and South Carolina. He was born in poverty, Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) had become a wealthy Tennessee lawyer and rising young politician by 1812, when war broke out between the United States and Britain. His leadership in that conflict earned Jackson national fame as a military hero, and he would become America’s most influential–and polarizing–political figure during the 1820s and 1830s.
He served as a major general in the War of 1812.
Died: June 8, 1845 at the Hermitage of congestive heart failure.

Those named for ANDREW JACKSON:
• Andrew Jackson “Andy” Dillon, b. 1887. Buried: Hannah Cemetery, Marrowbone Creek
• Andrew Jackson Newsome, b. Oct 3, 1880 Marrowbone Creek. Buried: Newsome Ridge Cemetery.
• Andrew Jackson Hannah, b. 1871. Buried: Hannah Cemetery, Marrowbone Creek
• Andrew Jackson “Jack” Meade, abt. 1893-1955- Melvin White Cemetery, Lenore

8th President: MARTIN VAN BUREN, a founder of the Democratic party. Served: 1837 – 1841.
Born: Dec 5, 1782 in Kinderhook, N.Y. to Abraham Van Buren and Maria Hoes Van Alen. He was the only president to speak English as a second language as his parents were of Dutch descent.
In 1821, served on the U.S. Senate. Van Buren was initially the leading candidate for the Democratic Party's nomination again in 1844, but his continued opposition to the annexation of Texas angered Southern Democrats, leading to the nomination of James K. Polk. Van Buren led a third-party ticket in 1848, and his candidacy most likely helped Whig nominee ZACHARY TAYLOR defeat Democrat LEWIS CASS.
Died: July 24, 1862 in Kinderhook, N.Y.

Those named for MARTIN VAN BUREN:
• Van Buren “Buren” Clark, b. 1878 d. 1942, married Martha Anna Hannah
• Martin Van Buren Marcum, b. 1830 Wayne Co, WV. Married Lusinda Crum.
• Van Buren Marcum, b. March 12, 1852 Wayne Co, WV. Buried: Williamson Cemetery, Mudlick.
• Martin Van Buren Prince, b. Aug 18, 1860 Wayne Co, WV. Married Eveline Messer & Roxana Hodge. Buried: Perry Point Cemetery, Jennie’s Creek. He was named for his uncle. Martin Van Buren Prince, b. 1837 VA.

Those named for LEWIS CASS:
• Lewis Cass Richmond, b. Jan 17, 1849 Wise Co, VA. He was father of and part founder of the Richmond Grocery and Richmond-Akers Hardware stores in Kermit, WV. Buried: Martin Co, KY.

9th President: WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, Party: Democrat-Republican, then Whig Party. He and vice-president, John Tyler, defeated Van Buren in the 1840 United States presidential election, making Harrison the first Whig to win the presidency. Served: March 1841 – April 1841*Died in Office.
Born: Feb 9, 1773 at Charles City County, Virginia, British America to Benjamin Harrison. Harrison was the last president born as a British subject in the Thirteen Colonies.
Died: April 4, 1841 in Washington, D.C. He served the shortest time in office of any of the presidents. Only 1 month after being elected.

P.S. There are many William Henry, Henry Harrison, and William Harrison’s but none born in the 1841 time period that would show being named in honor of him.

10th President: JOHN TYLER, Party: Independent from 1841-1862 but in 1844 was a New Democrat-Republican. Served: 1841 – 1845.
Born: March 29, 1790 at Charles City County, Virginia to John Tyler Sr. and Mary Armistead.
He was elected vice president on the 1840 Whig ticket with President William Henry Harrison. Tyler ascended to the presidency after Harrison's death in April 1841, only a month after the start of the new administration.
In the 1820s, the nation's only political party was the Democratic-Republican Party, and it split into factions. Tyler was initially a Democrat, but he opposed Andrew Jackson. This led Tyler to ally with the Whig Party.
He served as a Virginia state legislator, governor, U.S. representative, and U.S. senator. He believed that the president should set policy rather than Congress, and he sought to bypass the Whig establishment, led by Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky.
Died: Jan 18, 1862 at Richmond, Virginia.

Those named for JOHN TYLER:
• John Tyler Runyon, b. abt 1845. He is the father of Chloe Ann (Runyon) Maynard Spence Hatcher.

Those named for HENRY CLAY:
• Henry Clay Williamson, b. 17 Oct 1898. Buried: Williamson Cemetery, Mudlick.

11th President: JAMES KNOX POLK, Party: Democrat. Served: 1845 – 1849.
Born: Nov 2, 1795 in Pineville, N.C. to Samuel Polk and James Knox.
Polk is chiefly known for extending the territory of the United States through the Mexican–American War during his presidency, the United States expanded significantly with the annexation of the Republic of Texas, the Oregon Territory, and the Mexican Cession following the American victory in the Mexican–American War.
Died: June 15, 1849 in Nashville, Tennessee.

P.S. I have absolutely no one in any version of his name, named for him.

12th President: ZACHARY TAYLOR, Party: Whig. Served: 1849 -1850*Died in Office
Born: Nov 24, 1784 at Barboursville, VA to Richard Taylor and Sarah Dabney Strother.
Taylor previously was a career officer in the United States Army (1808-1849), rose to the rank of major general and became a national hero as a result of his victories in the Mexican–American War. As a result, he won election to the White House despite his vague political beliefs. His top priority as president was preserving the Union. He died sixteen months into his term, having made no progress on the most divisive issue in Congress, slavery.
Died: July 9, 1850 in Washington, D.C. He died in Office of stomach disease. New York politician, Millard Fillmore, served the remainder of his term.

Those named for ZACHARY TAYLOR:
• Zachary Taylor Booth, b & d Jun 22, 1999. Buried: Smith Cemetery, Autumn Lane, Marrowbone Creek
• Zachary Taylor Webb, b. March 25, 1853 head of Still Run, Wyoming Co, WV

13th President: MILLARD FILLMORE, Party: Anti-Masonic (1828–1832), Whig (1832–1855), Know Nothing (1855–1856), and Democratic (1857–1874). Served: 1850 – 1853. He was the last to be a member of the Whig Party while in the White House.
Born: Jan 7, 1800 in Moravia, N.Y. to Nathaniel Fillmore and Phoebe Millard. Fillmore was instrumental in the passing of the Compromise of 1850, a bargain that led to a brief truce in the battle over the expansion of slavery. He failed to win the Whig nomination for president in 1852 but gained the endorsement of the nativist Know Nothing Party four years later and finished third in the 1856 presidential election.
As the Whig Party broke up after Fillmore's presidency, many in his conservative wing joined the Know Nothings and formed the American Party.
Died: March 8, 1874 at Buffalo, N.Y.

Those named for MILLARD FILLMORE:
• Millard Filmore Copley, b. 1871 Lawrence Co, OH. Married Rhoda Marcum, daughter of Moses D. Marcum and Margaret Lucy Justice.
• Millard Filmore Vinson, b. 1884 WV. Buried: Copley Cemetery, Webb

14th President: FRANKLIN PIERCE, Party: Democratic. Served: 1853 – 1857.
Born: Nov 23, 1804 in Hillsborough, N.H. to Benjamin Pierce and Anna Kendrick.
He was a Brigadier-General of the Army in 1847-1848, taking part in the Mexican-American War.
Died: Oct 8, 1869 in Concord, N.H.

Those named for FRANKLIN PIERCE:
• Franklin Pierce Salmons, b. Oct 11, 1851 Louisa, KY, son of Rowland Salmons II and Nancy Cox.

15th President: JAMES BUCHANAN, Party: Federalist (1814–1824), Democratic-Republican (1824–1828), Democratic (1828–1868). Served: 1857 – 1861.
Born: April 23, 1791 at Cove Gap, Pennsylvania to to James Buchanan Sr. and Elizabeth Speer. His parents were both of Ulster Scot descent his father emigrated from Ramelton, Ireland in 1783.
He was a Freemason, and served as the Master of Masonic Lodge No. 43 in Lancaster, and as a District Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania.
He was the last president who served in the War of 1812.
Died: June 1, 1868 at Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

Those named for JAMES BUCHANAN:
• James Buchanon “Buck” Kirk, b. June 30, 1889 Martin Co, KY. Buried: Murphy Cemetery, East Kermit.

16th President: ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Supported the Whig Party but when it was in ruins in 1856, Lincoln joined the new Republican Party–formed largely in opposition to slavery’s extension into the territories. Served: 1861 – 1865**Assassinated
Born: Feb 12, 1809 to Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks in a one room log-cabin in Hardin Co, KY.
A self-taught lawyer, legislator and vocal opponent of slavery, was elected 16th president of the United States in November 1860, shortly before the outbreak of the Civil War. Lincoln proved to be a shrewd military strategist and a savvy leader: His Emancipation Proclamation paved the way for slavery’s abolition, while his Gettysburg Address stands as one of the most famous pieces of oratory in American history.

GENERAL GEORGE McCLELLAN, though beloved by his troops, continually frustrated Lincoln with his reluctance to advance, and when McClellan failed to pursue ROBERT E. LEE’s retreating Confederate Army in the aftermath of the Union victory at Antietam in September 1862, Lincoln removed him from command.
Two important Union victories in July 1863–at Vicksburg, Mississippi, and at the Battle of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania–finally turned the tide of the war. GENERAL GEORGE MEADE missed the opportunity to deliver a final blow against Lee’s army at Gettysburg, and Lincoln would turn by early 1864 to the victor at Vicksburg, ULYSSES S. GRANT, as supreme commander of the Union forces.
Grants basic plan for the 1864 campaign was to immobilize the army of Gen. Robert E. Lee near the Confederate capital at Richmond, Virginia, while GENERAL WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN led the western Union army southward through Georgia.
In 1864, Lincoln faced a tough reelection battle against the Democratic nominee, the former Union GENERAL GEORGE McCLELLAN, but Union victories in battle (especially General William T. Sherman’s capture of Atlanta in September) swung many votes the president’s way.

Died: April 15, 1865 in Washington D.C. The Union was on the brink of victory. Lincoln was shot the day before at Ford’s Theatre by actor and Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth. Lincoln’s assassination made him a martyr to the cause of liberty, and he is widely regarded as one of the greatest presidents in U.S. history.

Those named for ABRAHAM LINCOLN:
• Abraham Hensley, b. July 10, 1872 Martin Co, KY. Buried: Hensley Cemetery, Wolf Creek, Martin Co, KY
• Abraham Lincoln Moore, b. 1867 KY. Son of Samuel Moore and Mary Elizabeth Maynard of Pilgrim, KY

Those named for GENERAL WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN:
• William Tecumseh Sherman Hannah, b. 1873. Buried: Hannah Cemetery, Marrowbone Creek
• William Tecumseh Meade, b. Oct 7, 1848 Marrowbone Creek, Logan Co, VA. Buried: Originally on Marrowbone Creek at entrance of Big Laurel Branch.
• John Lincoln Smith, b. 1878, d. 1943. Married Anna Lowe died at Dingess
• Abraham Lincoln Smith, b. 1925. Married Clara Smith, son of John Lincon Smith and Anna Lowe. Buried: Trace Cemetery, Dingess

Some boys only carried his title, GENEREAL SHERMAN:
• General Sherman Marcum, b. July 20, 1889, Wayne Co, WV. Buried: Williamson Cemetery, Mudlick.

Those named for GENERAL GEORGE McCLELLAN:
• McClellan Moore, b. 1899 KY. Son of Ulysses S. Grant Moore and Mary Ellen Sartin.
• McClellan Hall Sr., b. 1899 Pike Co, KY. Buried: Murphy Cemetery, East Kermit
• McClelon Maynard, b. 1875 Logan Co, WV. Married Edna Evans. Her father William Anderson Evans is buried Evans Cemetery, Vinson Branch, Marrowbone Creek. Her mother was Elizabeth Ferrell.

President of the Confederate States, JEFFERSON DAVIS, 1861-1865:
As a member of the Democratic Party, he represented Mississippi in the United States Senate and the House of Representatives before the American Civil War. He previously served as the United States Secretary of War from 1853 to 1857 under President Franklin Pierce.
Davis married Sarah Knox Taylor, daughter of general and future President Zachary Taylor, in 1835, when he was 27 years old. They were both stricken with malaria soon thereafter, and Sarah died after three months of marriage.

P.S. Depending on the political leaning of a particular family, I’m thinking that many of the men named Jefferson could be named for him and NOT for Thomas Jefferson.

17th President: ANDREW JOHNSON, Party: Democrat. Served: 1865 – 1869.
Born: Dec 29, 1808, in a log cabin in Raleigh, N.C. to Jacob Johnson and Mary “Polly” McDonough.
In 1843, he was voted into the U.S. House of Representatives. While in Congress, Johnson introduced what would become the Homestead Act, which granted tracts of undeveloped public land to settlers (the act finally passed in 1862). In 1857 he took a seat in the U. S. Senate.
Six weeks after Johnson was inaugurated as U.S. vice president in 1865, Lincoln was murdered. On April 9, at Appomattox, Virginia, General Robert E. Lee (1807-1870) surrendered his Confederate army to General Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), effectively ending the Civil War. Five days later, on April 14, while Lincoln was attending a play at Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C., he was shot and fatally wounded by Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth (1838-1865). By the next morning, Lincoln was dead at age 56. That same day, Johnson was sworn in as president at his Washington hotel by the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, Salmon Chase (1808-1873).

As it happened, Johnson himself escaped death, because the assassin Booth’s original plot had also targeted the vice president and U.S. Secretary of State William Seward (1801-1872). Seward was attacked but survived, while Johnson’s assigned assailant, George Azterodt (1835-1865), lost his nerve at the last minute and did not go after Johnson.
As president, Johnson took a moderate approach to restoring the South to the Union, and clashed with Radical Republicans.
In 1868, he was impeached by Congress, but he was not removed from office. He did not run for a second presidential term. He was the first American president to be impeached.
Died: July 31, 1875 suffering a stroke while visiting family in Carter County, Tennessee.

Those named for ANDREW JOHNSON:
• Andrew Johnson Ferrell, b. 1866 Logan Co, VA. Married Mahala Kansas Parsley.

Those named for U.S. Secretary of State, WILLIAM SEWARD:
• Seward Waller, b. April 1, 1903, Wayne Co, WV. Many have said he was Sebart, but in other cases I have found him listed as Seward, even on his marriage. His father filling out the certificate.

Those named for GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE:
• Robert E. Lee Brewer, b. 1868 Selwyn, Marrowbone Creek. Buried: Brewer Cemetery, Rosetown, Marrowbone Creek
• General Lee Marcum, b. May 27, 1866 Wayne Co, WV. Buried: Williamson Cemetery, Mudlick.
• Robert E. Lee Porter, b. Aug 11, 1864 Elliott Co, KY. Buried: Murphy Cemetery, East Kermit
• Robert E. Lee Sartin, b. 1874 WV. Buried: Brewer-Fitzpatrick Cemetery, Marrowbone Creek

18th President: ULYSSES S. GRANT, ran for 2 consecutive terms of office, 1869-1877. Party: Republican.
Original name, Hiram Ulysses Grant. Grant decided to reverse his given names and enroll at the United States Military Academy as Ulysses Hiram (probably to avoid having the acronym HUG embroidered on his clothing) however, his congressional appointment was erroneously made in the name Ulysses S. Grant, the name he eventually accepted, maintaining that the middle initial stood for nothing. He came to be known as U.S. Grant—Uncle Sam Grant—and his classmates called him Sam. Born: Apr 27, 1822 Point Pleasant, OH. Son of Jesse Root Grant, a tanner, and Hannah Simpson.
In the Mexican-American War Grant showed gallantry in campaigns under GENERAL ZACHARY TAYLOR. He was then transferred to GENERAL WINFIELD SCOTT’s army, where he first served as regimental quartermaster and commissary.
Civil War Union veteran General Ulysses Grant won the presidency but struggled with a country amid Reconstruction.
Died: July 23, 1885 Mount McGregor, N.Y.

Those named for ULYSSES S. GRANT Grant was nicknamed the “Hero of Appomattox”:
• Ulysses Grant Miller, b. Feb 25, 1869. Buried: Warfield Cemetery, Warfield, KY. General Grant was sworn in on March 4, 1869. Zach’s grandad was given the middle name Grant, and then Zach was given it as well.
• Ulysses Grant Marcum, b. Jan 20, 1870 Wayne Co, WV. Buried: Marcum Cemetery, Stonecoal
• Ulysses Grant Marcum, b. Jan 1, 1888 Stonecoal. Buried: Dearnell Cemetery, Stonecoal

Marrowbone & Jennies Creek, Kermit, WV Cemeteries & History

Dandridge residence in Kermit damaged by fire Williamson Daily News 12 Jul 1961

Marrowbone & Jennies Creek, Kermit, WV Cemeteries & History

Mingo Street during the flood of April 1977, looking towards Meade Street. The white building on the left was storage for Richmond-Akers Hardware Co., then the Kermit Cash Store owned by George Dewey and Callie (Harmon) Preece and the Liquor Store with an advertisement for Black Draught laxative painted on the side.

Today, the lots where the Richmond-Akers Hardware storage building, Kermit Cash Store and the Liquor Store once stood are vacant. The telephone company building currently still stands on the opposite side of Meade Street.

Photo courtesy of Susan Ryan. The recreated picture was taken in March 2021.

You can read more about the history of the Kermit Cash Store, and George and Callie here: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=323829308278598&id=107115773283287

Marrowbone & Jennies Creek, Kermit, WV Cemeteries & History

This week in honor of Memorial Day, each day we will be sharing a post about the popularity of naming after key figures in history. This is our last day.

This entry came to me as one I should also include as many of our God fearing family named their children after the bible. I was named for my grandmother, Rhoda (Salmons) Marcum Dotson, and there are upteen Rhoda's in this area . . . but it originated from the Bible.

Day 4:
Those named for ADAM:
• Adam Crum, b. 1756 Augusta Co, VA. The first to bring in the Crum name to this part of WV.
• Adam Gayheart, b. 1925 Logan Co, WV. Married Rebecca Damron. Buried: Vinson Cemetery, Vinson Branch, Marrowbone Creek

Those named for AARON:
• Adam Brewer, b. 1834 Logan Co, WV. Buried: Brewer-Fitzpatrick Cemetery, forks of Marrowbone
• Aaron Fain, b. 1873 Crum, Wayne Co, WV. Buried: Brewer-Fitzpatrick Cemetery, forks of Marrowbone
• Aaron Fluty, b. 1826 Lawrence Co, KY. Brother to Mahala Fluty that married Joshua Marcum. Mahala and Joshua Marcum are buried at top of Williamson Cemetery, mouth of Mudlick, Jennie’s Creek
• Aaron Hensley, b. 1829 VA. Married Martha “Patsy” Ball. Lived at Long Branch, Martin Co, KY
• Aaron Marcum, b. 1849 Wayne Co, WV. Son of Joshua and Mahala Fluty Marcum.
• Aaron Stepp, b. 1827 Pike Co, KY. Whose son’s, Laban T. Stepp, daughters are buried at the Brewer Cemetery, mouth of Marrowbone Creek.
• Aaron Henry Cornes, b. 1864 Clay Co, WV. Buried: Herald-Corns Cemetery, Jennie’s Creek

Those named for DAVID:
• David C. Brewer, b. 1860 Logan Co, VA. Buried: Dave Brewer Cemetery, Marrowbone Creek
• David Crum, b. 1807. Son of Adam Crum and Barbara Horn.
• David Hodge, b. 1857 VA. Son of John Hodge and Fidelia Clark.
• David May, b. abt 1859 Pike Co, KY. Married Causby Dempsey.
• David Sartin, b. 1904 Kermit. Buried: Brewer-Fitzpatrick Cemetery, forks of Marrowbone Creek
• Captain David Wilkinson, b. 1837 Wythe Co, VA. Married Rebecca Chafin, daughter of William Chafin Sr. and Sarah Deskins. Rebecca is buried Vinson Cemetery, Vinson Branch, Marrowbone Creek.

Those named for GIDEON:
• Gideon Parsley Sr., b. 1877 WV. Buried: Williamson Cemetery, mouth of Mudlick, Jennie’s Creek
• Gideon D. Bailey, b. 1885 WV. Son of James D. Bailey and Malinda Marcum.
• Gideon D. Hampton, b. 1844. Son of Henry Cary Hampton Jr. and Alafair Watts.
• Gideon D. Marcum, b. 1890 Wayne Co, WV. Son of General Lee Marcum who is buried at Williamson Cemetery, mouth of Mudlick, Jennie’s Creek.
• Gideon D. Messer, b. 1870 Logan Co, WV. Married Martha Ann Block. Both buried at Marcum-Johnson Cemetery, Cotton Hill, Wayne Co, WV
• Gideon Dee Marcum, b. 1825, KY. Married Jane Hampton. Son of Moses Marcum and Eda Bryant.

Those named for ISAAC:
• Isaac Brewer Sr., b. 1789 VA. Married Elizabeth Meade. Early settler of Marrowbone Creek, having owned land here before 1839
• Isaac Collins, brother of Susanna Collins, first wife of Moses D. Marcum. They divorced and Moses later married Margaret Lucy Justice.
• Isaac Ferrell, b. 1871 Logan Co, WV. Son of Moses Ferrell and Matilda Brewer.
• Isaac Fitzpatrick, b. 1905 WV. Son of William Sanford Fitch and Amanda Meade.
• Isaac Marcum, b. 1844 VA. Married Rebecca Brewer.
• Isaac Newsome, b. 1865 Marrowbone Creek, WV. Son of Harmon Newsome and Lydia Brewer.
• Isaac Harmon Hannah Sr., b. 1845 Floyd Co, KY. Buried: Hannah Cemetery, Big Laurel Branch, Marrowbone Creek

Those named for JACOB:
• Jacob “Jingo Jake” Marcum, b. 1780 Lee Co, VA. Married Rhoda Saddler. Oldest son of Josiah Marcum. Buried: Marcum Cemetery, Tickridge, Wayne Co, WV.
• Jacob Baach, father of Isaiah Lee Baach, b. 1872. Lee Baach was a teacher and buried at Brewer-Fitzpatrick Cemetery, forks of Marrowbone Creek
• Jacob Collins, b. 1824 N.C. Married Elizabeth Spaulding. Buried: Anderson Cemetery, Jennie’s Creek
• Jacob Spaulding, b. 1829 KY. Son of Fleming Spaulding and Polly Akers

Those named for JOSIAH:
• Josiah Marcum, b. 1759 Chesterfield Co, VA. First Marcum to settle in Cabell Co, VA, and thus began the prolific family of Marcum. Buried on Jennie’s Creek in a lone grave.
• Josiah Thomas Wiles, b. 1846, Mouth of Wilson, Ashe Co, N.C. Buried: Wiles Cemetery, left fork of Marrowbone

Those named for LABAN:
• Laban T. Stepp, b. 1862 KY. His 3 children, William Harlan, Hazel and Maude are all buried at the Brewer Cemetery, mouth of Marrowbone Creek.

Those named for LAZARUS:
• Lazarus Dameron, b. 1765 VA. He had children both by Jane Jarrell, and wife Nancy Elizabeth Short. He brought both the Jarrell and Dameron families to this portion of the country.
• Lazarus Marcum, b. 1869 WV. Married Polly Williamson. Both are buried Marcum Cemetery, Tickridge
• Lazarus Salmons, b. 1876 KY. Married Nancy Jane Mills. Both buried Salmons-Marcum Cemetery, left fork of Bull Creek
• Lazarus “Lace” V. Waller, b. 1872 Rock Camp, Ohio. Married Melvina Muncy. Both buried Anderson Cemetery, Jennie’s Creek

Those named for MOSES:
• Moses Baisden, b. 1892 Kermit, WV. Married Jane Vanderpool. They are buried at Moses Baisden Cemetery, Antney Branch, Marrowbone Creek
• Moses Block, b. 1896 Mingo Co, WV. Buried: Lillian Brewer Parsley Cemetery, Left for of Marrowbone
• Moses Chaffins, b. 1864 KY. Buried: Murphy Cemetery, East Kermit.
• Moses Ferrell, b. 1829 WV. Minister who married couples on Marrowbone Creek. Buried: Moses Ferrell Cemetery, Marrowbone Creek.
• Moses Marcum, b. 1785 N.C. Son of Josiah Marcum and Eda McDonald.
• Moses Parsley I, b. 1752 Pittsylvania Co, VA. Married Obedience Ryburn.

Those named for SOLOMON:
• Solomon Baisden, married Mary Ann Chafin. Son of John Smith Baisden and Rhoda Branham.
• Solomon James, b. 1873 Martin Co, KY. Son of John James and Rhoda Brewer. Buried at Brewer Cemetery, mouth of Marrowbone Creek
• Solomon Lackey, b. 1840 WV. Married Pricy Lester. Buried: Lackey Cemetery, Marrowbone Ridge
• Solomon S. Marcum, b. 1858 WV. Married Pearlina Pack. Son of Moses Denver Marcum and Susanna Collins.
• Solomon Franklin Fuller, b. 1879 KY. Married Violet Stafford. Possibly buried in Fuller Cemetery on Jennie’s Creek.
• Solomon Xerxes Marcum, b. 1887 Wayne Co, WV. Son of Rev. Joseph Marcum Marcum and Mary Marcum. Buried: Brewer Cemetery, Westwood, Ashland, KY. (I was told by his grandson that he was named for 2 Kings in the Bible.

Then you had some couples/ladies that were adventurous in naming their sons. Maybe they were readers of olden tales and fell in love with the names of their characters:

Those named for CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS:
• John Columbus Chafin, b & d 1944. Buried: Solon Chafin Cemetery, Marrowbone Creek
• Christopher Columbus Chaffin, b. 1891. Buried: Chaffin Cemetery, Hode, Martin County, KY
• Columbus Evans, b. Feb 6, 1892. Buried: Brewer-Fitzpatrick Cemetery, Forks of Marrowbone
• Christopher Columbus Messer, b. Nov 29, 1913. Buried: Perry Point Cemetery, Jennie’s Creek
• Christopher Columbus Murphy, b. Sep 20, 1884 Pike Co, Ky. Buried: Murphy Cemetery, East Kermit
• Christopher Columbus Preece, b. Sep 24, 1876 Martin Co, KY. Buried: Stepp Cemetery, Kermit.
• Christopher Columbus Spaulding, b. May 10, 1905 Wayne Co, WV. Buried: Brewer-Fitzpatrick Cemetery

Those named after the Marquis de LAFAYETTE:
• Lafayette Block, b. Nov 4, 1886 WV. Buried Brewer-Fitzpatrick Cemetery.
• Lafayette F. Herald, b. May 6, 1866 Tick Ridge, Wayne Co, WV. Buried: Herald-Corns Cemetery, Jennie’s Creek
• Lafayette Fred Marcum, b. Jan. 1, 1861 Wayne Co, WV. Buried: Anderson Cemetery
• Lafayette F. “Lafie” Crum, b. May 20, 1881 Martin Co, KY. Buried: Murphy Cemetery
• Lafayette F. Salmons, b. Sept 8, 1874 Dunlow, Wayne Co, WV. Buried: Alleghany Memorial Park, VA

There were local dignitaries that had such influence that places were named for them:
ANTHONY WAYNE: (January 1, 1745 – December 15, 1796) was an American soldier, officer and statesman of Irish descent. He adopted a military career at the outset of the American Revolutionary War, where his military exploits and fiery personality quickly earned him promotion to brigadier general and the nickname "Mad Anthony". He later served as the Senior Officer of the Army on the Ohio Country frontier and led the Legion of the United States.

Those named for ANTHONY WAYNE:
• Anthony Wayne Brewer, b. 1831 Logan Co, VA. Buried: Brewer-Fitzpatrick Cemetery, Marrowbone
• Anthony Wayne Brewer, b. March 25, 1861 Logan Co, WV. Buried: Anthony Wayne Brewer Cemetery, Antney Branch, Marrowbone Creek
• Anthony Wayne Brewer (Spaulding), b. March 1, 1876 Marrowbone creek. Buried: Brewer Cemetery, Marrowbone Creek
• Rev. Anthony Wayne Mead, b. June 11, 1852 Logan Co, VA. Buried: Maher, Mingo Co, WV
• Anthony Wayne Sartin, b. Aug 12, 1884 Logan Co, WV. Buried: Brewer-Sartin Cemetery, Marrowbone Creek
• Anthony Wayne Sturgill Sr., b. Sep 19, 1886 Mingo Co, WV. Buried: Wayne Sturgill Cemetery, Big Laurel Branch, Marrowbone Creek

Those named for LORENZO DOW:
(October 16, 1777 – February 2, 1834) was an eccentric itinerant American evangelist, said to have preached to more people than any other preacher of his era. He became an important figure and a popular writer. His autobiography at one time was the second best-selling book in the United States, exceeded only by the Bible.
• Lorenzo D. Chapman, b. 1860 VA. Buried at Long Branch Cemetery, along the ridge leading up to that road. Son of Jim Burl Chapman and Martha J. Evans.
• Lorenzo Dow Hensley, b. 1848 KY. Married Rebecca Parsley. Son of Abraham Hensley and Jane Ball
• Lorenzo D. Harrison, b. 1848 KY. Married Sarah Ann Hensley, daughter of above Lorenzo Dow Hensley and Rebecca Parsley.
• Lorenzo D. McKenzie, b. 1899 Ft. Gay, WV. Married Alcie Marie Marcum, daughter of John Lincoln Marcum and Anna Spaulding.
• Lorenzo Dow McGranaham, father of John Q. McGranaham b. 1864, mentioned in a previous post

Those named for PYRRHUS (319/318–272 BC) who was a Greek king and statesman of the Hellenistic period. He was king of the Greek tribe of Molossians, of the royal Aeacid house, and later he became king of Epirus. He was one of the strongest opponents of early Rome, and regarded as one of the greatest generals of antiquity. Several of his victorious battles caused him unacceptably heavy losses, from which the term Pyrrhic victory was coined.

• Pyrrhus Bingham Meade, b. June 9, 1869 Wayne Co, WV. Buried Brewer-Fitzpatrick Cemetery
• Pyrrhus Evans, b. Feb 22, 1867 WV. Buried Newsome Cemetery, Big Branch, Mingo Co, WV
• Purrus Fields, b. March 8, 1879 WV. Buried Anderson Cemetery, Jennie’s Creek


Watch the video: John Tyler: His Accidency 1841 - 1845 (January 2022).