History Podcasts

CVE-117 U.S.S. Saidor - History

CVE-117 U.S.S. Saidor - History

Saidor

(CVE-117: dp. 10,900; 1. 557', b. 75', ew. 105'2", dr. 31'; s. 19 k.; cpl. 1,066; a. 2 5", 36 40mm., act 34; cl. Commencement Bay)

Saltery Bay, renamed Saidor (CVE-117) on 5 June 1944, was laid down on 29 September 1944 by ToddPacific Shipyards, Inc., Tacoma, Wash., Launched on 17 March 1945; sponsored by Mrs. Walter F. Boone and commissioned on 4 September 1945, Capt. A. P. Storrs in command.

Following shakedown off the United States west coast, she served at Pearl Harbor from 12 December 1945 to 20 March 1946. Sailing via the Panama Canal, she operated at Norfolk, Va., from 16 to 22 April before returning via the Panama Canal to the west coast. Departing San Diego on 6 May, Saidor arrived at Bikini on the 24th to serve as a photographic laboratory for the atomic bomb testing program Operation "Crossroads." She processed film, documenting the destructive power of atomic weapons on selected targets at various ranges, during the nuclear explosions of 1 and 25 July. She departed Bikini on 4 August and returned to San Diego where she remained into 1947, when she began inactivation.

Saidor was decommissioned on 12 September 1947 and berthed with the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Diego. Reclassified CVHE-117 on 12 June 1955, and AKV-17 on 7 May 1959, she remained in the Reserve Fleet until 1 December 1970 when she was struck from the Navy list. She was sold to American Ship Dismantlers, Portland, Oreg., for scrapping on 22 October 1971.


USS Saidor (CVE-117)

Originally named the Saltery Bay, she was renamed on 5 June 1944, was laid down on 29 September 1944 by Todd-Pacific Shipyards, Inc., Tacoma, Washington launched on 17 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Walter F. Boone and commissioned on 4 September 1945, Capt. A. P. Storrs in command.

Following shakedown off the United States west coast, she served at Pearl Harbor from 12 December 1945 to 20 March 1946. Sailing via the Panama Canal, she operated at Norfolk, Va., from 16 April to 22 April, before returning via the Panama Canal to the west coast. Departing San Diego on 6 May, Saidor arrived at Bikini on the 24th to serve as a photographic laboratory for the atomic bomb testing program, Operation Crossroads. She processed film, documenting the destructive power of atomic weapons on selected targets at various ranges, during the nuclear explosions of 1 July and 25 July. She departed Bikini on 4 August and returned to San Diego where she remained into 1947, when she began inactivation.

Saidor was decommissioned on 12 September 1947 and berthed with the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Diego. Reclassified CVHE-117 on 12 June 1955, and AKV-17 on 7 May 1959, she remained in the Reserve Fleet until 1 December 1970 when she was struck from the Navy list. She was sold to American Ship Dismantlers, Portland, Oreg., for scrapping on 22 October 1971.


'Tennessine' acknowledges state institutions' roles in element's discovery

OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Nov. 30, 2016 — The recently discovered element 117 has been officially named "tennessine" in recognition of Tennessee’s contributions to its discovery, including the efforts of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and its Tennessee collaborators at Vanderbilt University and the University of Tennessee.

"The presence of tennessine on the Periodic Table is an affirmation of our state's standing in the international scientific community, including the facilities ORNL provides to that community as well as the knowledge and expertise of the laboratory's scientists and technicians," ORNL Director Thom Mason said.

"The historic discovery of tennessine is emblematic of the contributions Tennessee institutions like Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee and Vanderbilt University make toward a better world,” Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam said . “On behalf of all Tennesseans we thank this world body for honoring our state this way.”

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC)—which validates the existence of newly discovered elements and approves their official names—gave its final approval to the name “tennessine” following a year-long process that began Dec. 30, 2015, when IUPAC and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics announced verification of the existence of the superheavy element 117, more than five years after scientists first reported its discovery in April 2010.

ORNL had several roles in the discovery, the most prominent being production of the radioisotope berkelium-249 for the search. The berkelium-249 used in the initial discovery and subsequent confirmatory experiments for element 117 was produced by ORNL and the Department of Energy’s Isotope Program, and was provided as a U.S. contribution to those experiments.

Superheavy elements, which do not occur naturally, are synthesized by exposing a radioisotope target to a beam of another specific isotope. In theory, the nuclei will in rare cases combine into a "superheavy" and heretofore unknown element.

In tennessine's case, the atomic recipe for element 117 required the berkelium-249 target, which was available only from ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), which produces radioisotopes for industry and medicine in addition to its neutron scattering research mission, and the adjoining Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), where the radioisotopes are processed.

Over a year-long campaign, ORNL produced and then shipped the 22 milligrams of berkeleium-249 to Russia, where the experiment that would yield element 117 was carried out with a heavy-ion cyclotron at Russia's Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna. After six months of relentless bombardment with a calcium-48 beam, researchers had detected six atoms in which the nuclei of the calcium and berkelium had fused to create element 117. Subsequent experiments confirmed the results.

"The discovery of tennessine is an example of the potential that can be realized when nations come together to lend their unique capabilities toward a scientific vision," said ORNL's Jim Roberto, who helped put together the element 117 U.S.-Russia collaboration with JINR's Yuri Oganessian.

Beyond producing the necessary radioisotope, ORNL has a long history in nuclear physics research that enabled the laboratory to contribute knowledge from researchers experienced in nuclear physics and international collaboration and tools in the form of detectors, instruments and electronics.

The lab also has a history of partnership in physics research with Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., which initiated discussions that led to the historic collaboration, and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, which participated in experiments that confirmed the discovery.

DOE’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California rounded out the element 117 team. Livermore has an accomplished record in superheavy element research and is the namesake of livermorium (element 116).

The specific spelling of tennessine was chosen because the new element is classified as a halogen, a type of element that by convention ends in the suffix "-ine." Halogens include elements such as chlorine and fluorine. Tennessine's symbol on the Periodic Table will be Ts.

Discoveries of new elements at ORNL began with the Manhattan Project. During World War II, researchers at ORNL's Graphite Reactor discovered promethium—element 61 on the Periodic Table. Because of the secrecy that enveloped the project to develop the first nuclear weapons, the discovery wasn't reported until after the war, in 1947.

In addition to element 117 (tennessine), ORNL-produced materials and isotopes via the DOE Isotope Program have been used in the discoveries of superheavy elements 104 (rutherfordium), 105 (dubnium), 106 (seaborgium), 114 (flerovium), 115 (moscovium), 116 (livermorium) and 118 (oganesson).

The discovery of superheavy elements, which typically exist for only fractions of seconds, is driven by a quest for the long-predicted "island of stability," in which new elements beyond the existing Periodic Table may survive for exceptionally long periods of time, opening up new and useful vistas of physics and chemistry.

This research was supported by the DOE Office of Science. The High Flux Isotope Reactor is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.


USS Saidor

Originally named the Saltery Bay, she was renamed on 5 June 1944, was laid down on 29 September 1944 by Todd-Pacific Shipyards, Inc., Tacoma, Washington launched on 17 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Walter F. Boone and commissioned on 4 September 1945, Capt. A. P. Storrs in command.

Following shakedown off the United States west coast, she served at Pearl Harbor from 12 December 1945 to 20 March 1946. Sailing via the Panama Canal, she operated at Norfolk, Va., from 16 April to 22 April, before returning via the Panama Canal to the west coast. Departing San Diego on 6 May, Saidor arrived at Bikini on the 24th to serve as a photographic laboratory for the atomic bomb testing program, Operation Crossroads. She processed film, documenting the destructive power of atomic weapons on selected targets at various ranges, during the nuclear explosions of 1 July and 25 July. She departed Bikini on 4 August and returned to San Diego where she remained into 1947, when she began inactivation.

Saidor was decommissioned on 12 September 1947 and berthed with the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Diego. Reclassified CVHE-117 on 12 June 1955, and AKV-17 on 7 May 1959, she remained in the Reserve Fleet until 1 December 1970 when she was struck from the Navy list. She was sold to American Ship Dismantlers, Portland, Oreg., for scrapping on 22 October 1971.


Ex parte Royall (117 U.S. 241)

On the twenty-ninth day of May, 1885, William L. Royall filed two petitions in the circuit court of the United States for the Eastern district of Virginia, each verified by oath, and addressed to the judges of that court. In one of them he represents, in substance, that he is a citizen of the United States that in June, 1884, as a representative of a citizen of New York,-who was the owner of certain bonds issued by Virginia under the act approved March 30, 1871, entitled 'An act to provide for the funding and payment of the public debt,'-he sold in the city of Richmond, to Richard W. Maury, for the sum of $10.50 in current money, a genuine past-due coupon, cut from one of said bonds in petitioner's presence, and which he received from the owner, with instructions to sell it in that city for the best market price that said coupon bears upon its face the contract of Virginia that it should be received in payment of all taxes, debts, and demands due that commonwealth that he acted in said matter without compensation and, consequently, the transaction was a sale of the coupon by its owner.

The petition proceeds: 'That on the second day of June, 1884, the grand jury of the city of Richmond, Virginia, found an indictment against your petitioner for selling said coupon without a license that the before-mentioned coupon is the only one that your petitioner has sold that your petitioner was thereupon arrested and committed to the custody of N. M. Lee, sergeant of the city of Richmond, to be tried on said indictment, and that he will be prosecuted and tried on said indictment for selling said coupon without a license, under the provisions of section 65 of the act of March 15, 1884, relating to licenses generally, and the general provisions of the state law in respect to doing business without a license that your petitioner had no license under the laws of Virginia to sell coupons that the act of the general assembly under which your petitioner was arrested, and is being prosecuted, requires any person who sells one or more of the said tax-receivable coupons issued by said state of Virginia to pay to said state, before said sale, a special license tax of $1,000, and, in addition thereto, a tax of twenty per cent, on the face value of each coupon sold that said act does not require the seller of any other coupon, or the seller of anything else, to pay said tax, but it is directed exclusively against the sellers of such coupons that your petitioner is being prosecuted under said act because he sold said coupon without having first paid to said state said special license tax, and without paying to her said special tax of twenty per cent. on the face value thereof that said act of the general assembly of Virginia is repugnant to section ten of article one of the constitution of the United States, and is therefore null and void that if the said state can refuse to pay the said coupons at maturity, and then tax the sale of them to tax-payers, she may thus indirectly repudiate then absolutely, and thus effectually destroy their value that your petitioner has been on bail from the time he was arrested until now, but that his bail has now surrendered him, and he is at this time in the custody of the said N. M. Lee, sergeant of the city of Richmond, to be prosecuted and tried on said indictment that he is held in violation of the constitution of the United States, as he is advised.'

In the other petition he represents, in substance, that, under the provisions of the before-mentioned act of 1871, Virginia issued her bonds, with interest coupons attached, and bearing upon their face a contract to receive them in payment of all taxes, debts, and demands due to that commonwealth that another act, approved January 14, 1882, provides that said coupons shall not be received in payment of taxes until after judgment rendered in a suit thereon according to its provisions that the validity of the latter act was sustained in Antoni v. Greenhow, 107 U.S. 769, S.C.. 2 Sup. Ct. Rep. 91, upon the ground that it furnished tax-payers with a sufficient remedy to enforce said contract that by the provisions of sections 90 and 91 of chapter 450 of the laws of Virginia for the year 1883-84, it is provided that attorneys at law who have been licensed to practice law less than five years shall pay a license tax of $15, and those licensed more than five years $25, and that such license shall entitle the attorney paying it to practice law in all the courts of the state that it is further provided by said ninety-first section that no attorney shall bring any suit on said coupons under said act of January 14, 1882, unless he pays, in addition to the above-mentioned license tax, a further special license tax of $250 that petitioner had been licensed to practice law more than five years, and that in the month of April, 1884, he paid $25, receiving a revenue license to practice law in all the courts of the state, but that he had not paid the additional special license tax provided for in said ninety-first section that, under employment of a client who had tendered coupons, issued by Virginia under the act of March 30, 1871, to the treasurer of Richmond city in payment of his taxes, and thereafter had paid his tax in money,-the coupons having been received by that officer for identification and verification, and certified to the hustings court of the city of Richmond,-he brought suit under the act of January 14, 1882, to recover the money back after proving the genuineness of the coupons that the grand jury of the city of Richmond thereupon found an indictment against him for bringing the suit without having paid the special license tax that he brought it after he had paid his license tak above mentioned, and while he had a license to practice law until April, 1885 that he was thereupon arrested by order of the hustings court of Richmond, committed to the custody of N. M. Lee, sergeant of that city, and is about to be tried and punished under said indictment that the act requiring him to pay a special license tax in addition to his general license tax is repugnant to section 10 of article 1 of the constitution of the United States, and is therefore null and void and that the act providing for punishing him for not paying the special license tax is likewise repugnant to the constitution. After stating, at some length, the grounds upon which he contends that the before-mentioned acts are repugnant to the constitution, the petitioner avers that he 'is now in the custody of the said N. M. Lee, sergeant of the city of Richmond, under said indictment, and he is therefore restrained of his liberty in violation of the constitution of the United States.'

Each petition concludes with a prayer that the circuit court award a writ of habeas corpus directed to that officer, commanding him to produce the body of the petitioner before that court, together with the cause of his detention, and that he have judgment discharging him from custody. In each case the petition was dismissed upon the ground that the circuit court was without jurisdiction to discharge the prisoner from prosecution.

Wm. L. Royall and D. H. Chamberlain, for appellant.

F. S. Bean, Walter R. Staples, and R. A. Ayers, for respondents.

Mr. Justice HARLAN, after stating the facts in the foregoing language, delivered the opinion of the court:


Sikorsky Product History

The Sikorsky S-49/R-6/HOS-1 model was a follow-on to the successful R-4 helicopter with the first flight on October 15, 1943. It was designed as a streamlined R-4 with an all metal fuselage, a larger engine, and a planetary gear main gear box. The XR-6 helicopters featured the R-4B 38 foot 3 bladed fully articulated main rotor and a 3 bladed tail rotor powered by a 225 hp Lycoming O435-7 six cylinder horizontally opposed engine. The Lycoming engine was replaced by a 235 hp Franklin O-405-9 engine in the XR-6A and all subsequent R-6 models. The S-49 had 2 place side by side seating in the cockpit. One Experimental XR-6 and five XR-6A/XHOS-1 helicopters were initially built by Sikorsky Aircraft.

On March 2, 1944 a Sikorsky XR-6A helicopter flew non-stop from Washington, D.C. to Patterson Field in Dayton Ohio a distance of 387 miles in 4 hours 55 minutes with a ground speed of 80 mph. The flight crossed the Allegheny Mountains at an altitude of 5,000 feet. The pilot was Colonel Frank Gregory and the passenger was Ralph Alex, the Sikorsky project engineer. World records for speed, distance and endurance by a helicopter were eclipsed by this flight.

Since Sikorsky Aircraft was at maximum production capacity with the R-4 and R-5 models, the USAAF, Production Division at Wright Field directed that the S-49/R-6 production be License built by Nash-Kelvinator. Nash-Kelvinator was selected since they were already producing Hamilton Standard Propellers and Pratt and Whitney Double Wasp R-2800 engines under Licenses from United Aircraft Corporation. Sikorsky Aircraft was very reluctant to release control over helicopter production and showed little interest in accepting a contract to furnish the engineering and design data while another manufacturer did the fabrication. Sikorsky eventually complied with the government decision.

Nash-Kelvinator was awarded a contract for 26 YR-6A developmental helicopters followed by a production contract for 900 R-6A helicopters. Since the Kenosha and Milwaukee Wisconsin areas (Nash-Kelvinator&rsquos home) had labor shortages, the War Production Board directed Nash-Kelvinator to build the R-6 helicopters elsewhere. Nash-Kelvinator built cabins in Grand Rapids, Michigan and performed final assembly in Detroit Michigan. Other components came from suppliers across the country including Sikorsky Aircraft providing Rotors, gearboxes, blades, and most drivetrain components. Production was slow in coming mainly because Sikorsky made countless changes to the original design which delayed the delivery of drawings for long periods of time. The XR-6A prototypes were still in Testing and Sikorsky wanted the helicopter to be as perfect as possible before releasing the production drawings. As a result Nash-Kelvinator did not test its first production model until mid-September 1944 with the first delivery on October 23, 1944. Nash-Kelvinator had 4 assembly lines producing 16 helicopters at a time. At peak production Nash-Kelvinator was producing 50 helicopters per month. Production was halted in 1945 with Nash-Kelvinator producing 219 R-6 helicopters.


Nash-Kelvinator R-6 production line in Detroit Michigan


S-49/R-6 Development Timeline

  • April 30, 1943. Cost plus fixed fee contract for six XR-6 helicopters signed.
  • October 15, 1943. First Flight of the XR-6
  • September 1943. Contract negotiated with Nash-Kelvinator to build R-6 helicopters. Sikorsky contracted to provide engineering services and dynamic components.
  • August 28, 1943. Production contract for Nash-Kelvinator to build 900 Sikorsky R-6A helicopters under license signed.
  • March 2, 1944. XR-6A set unofficial nonstop distance record of 397 miles in 4 hours 55 minutes.
  • September 1944 First XHOS-1 delivered to USN and transferred to USCG Air Station Floyd Bennett Field.


First YR-6A Helicopter completed by Nash-Kelvinator in Detroit

  • January 1945. Last XR-6A accepted by USAAF.
  • May 27, 1945. Three R-6A helicopters make first helicopter rescue in China. Three crewmen from a C-46 crash in the Yuan Chiang Valley are rescued nearly 100 miles from the helicopter base in Kunming, China.
  • July 14, 1945. Army R-6A helicopter dispatched to the Paricutin Volcano in Michoacán, Mexico to gather scientific information by hovering over the volcano. The scientists benefited by studying the lightning-like discharges with thunder within the erupting material and the Army gained experience with high altitude (over 8,700 feet), turbulence, and high temperature operations similar to those encountered in the South Pacific. Over 60 flights were conducted. Igor Sikorsky, an amateur volcanologist, accompanied the expedition.


R-6A flies over Paricutin volcano in Mexico July, 1945


VX-3 Sikorsky HOS-1 takes off from a Seaplane Tender

Configuration Features

The Sikorsky S-49 fuselage was built in 5 major sections: 1. Cabin Section - a non-structural frame formed of plastic and a resin impregnated glass fibre cloth externally covered by dural cap strips, transparent plastic windows, and side by side seating for two 2. Lower Beam Assembly - an aluminum structure that provided the cockpit floor which supported the entire nose section of the helicopter 3. Center Section - a tubular steel frame 4. Fairing Assembly - provided a covering for the center section made as plastic laminate panels, and 5. Tail Cone - a dural aluminum frame with magnesium skins and a semi monocoque design.

Main Rotor Assembly
A 3 blade fully articulated main rotor head was installed on the R-6 helicopter. The rotor diameter was 38 feet. This was the same rotor as the R-4B helicopter.


S-49 (R-6) Main Rotor Assembly

Main Gear Box
The main gear box with a magnesium housing stood vertically between the engine and main rotor. It conveyed power to the main rotor at reduced speed ratio of 12.96 to 1 and to the tail rotor at a reduced speed ratio of 1.309 to 1. It also included a freewheeling unit to allow autorotation in case of engine failure. A hydraulic rotor brake was located at the rear of the main gear box. The S-49 main gear box contained a planetary system gear reduction system. This was the first use of this method for speed reduction in Sikorsky helicopters and various planetary configurations were used in most subsequent Sikorsky helicopters.


A cutaway of the S-49 (R-6A) Planetary Main Gear Box


Engine
A Franklin 235 hp O-405-9 six cylinder horizontally opposed engine was installed vertically under the center section of the helicopter with a cooling fan/flywheel above. A centrifugal clutch connected the engine to the main gear box.

Main Rotor Blades
The main rotor blades were constructed with tubular steel spars, plywood ribs and leading edge, canvas covered pockets, and a NACA 0012 airfoil.

Tail Rotor
An articulated tail rotor with 3 blades was installed. Blades were constructed of laminated wood with a fabric cover.

General Arrangement Drawing

Mission Systems

The tactical mission of the S-49 helicopter was for liaison, observation and medical evacuation. The fuselage was equipped with attach points for &ldquoHot Dog&rdquo floats and provisions for tubes to support dual litters or bomb racks.

U.S. Coast Guard S-49 (HOS-1) helicopters were equipped with rescue hoists, emergency flotation gear, and bubbles on the fuselage to accommodate a stretcher horizontally across the cabin.


USCG S-49 (HOS-1) over Kill Devil Hills, NC with Igor Sikorsky as a passenger December 17, 1947

Provisions for carrying 2 enclosed litters were provided for the R-6A. The original design also included bomb racks to carry bombs and depth charges, but in late 1944 the Bomb Racks were deleted from the requirements.


1964, Seoul, South Korea to Juneau, AK, Airmail, #10 (32427)

Please see scan. Please READ the below information carefully. Payment is due within 5 days of auction close. If mailing payment, it must be received within 14 days of auction close. Visa/Mastercharge, paypal, and other forms of payment. Orders general . Read More

Item Specifics
Item Description

Please READ the below information carefully. Payment is due within 5 days of auction close. If mailing payment,

it must be received within 14 days of auction close. Visa/Mastercharge, paypal, and other forms of payment.

Orders generally ship within 48 hours of payment. Shipping and Handling is $4.00 in the USA which includes postage,

secure packing and delivery confirmation. Insurance, Registration, Priority Mail and/or Express Mail is extra.

Overseas, Pls inquire Insurance is not available outside the USA. International customers are responsible for all

import duties and tariffs associated with this item. Multiple bids are combined for reduced shipping. Washington

state residents are required to pay 8.8% sales tax unless a valid UBI number is provided. All items sold are genuine

and guaranteed 100% refund if not satisfied. Items return MUST be as received with original markings, packing, etc.


U.S.S. Pasadena CL-65

Bound in this volume is the history of your ship the U.S.S. Pasedena. This book has been written by the officers and men of the ship upon which you so gallantly served.

The pictures cover the whole course of the war in which the Pasadena took part, including its launching and commissioning.

The narrative is non professional and each department's History was written by one of its own officers or men.

To those of you returning to civilian life this book will serve as an informal record of your service in the Navy.


CVE-117 U.S.S. Saidor - History

USS Newman K. Perry , a 2425-ton Gearing class destroyer, was built at Orange, Texas. Converted for radar picket missions while fitting out, she was placed in commission in late July 1945, a few weeks before Japan's acceptance of Allied terms brought World War II's fighting to an end. After brief service with the Atlantic Fleet, in the final months of 1945 Newman K. Perry steamed through the Panama Canal and across the Pacific to begin her first tour of duty in Far Eastern waters. In mid-1946 she operated in support of Operation "Crossroads", the atomic bomb tests in the Marshall Islands, and in 1947-1948 made a second deployment to the western Pacific.

In formal recognition of her radar picket capabilities, in March 1949 Newman K. Perry was redesignated DDR-883 and, soon afterwards, transferred to the Atlantic Fleet. Later in the year she began the first of a long series of deployments to the Mediterranean and Black Seas. These cruises, which took much of her time during the next twenty-four years, were punctuated by operations in the western Atlantic and the Caribbean. The destroyer also paid occasional visits to northern Europe and west Africa.

In 1953 Newman K. Perry received more advanced radar equipment, an updated combat information center and new anti-aircraft guns. In March 1961 she participated in the recovery effort for the Project "Mercury" space flight, and, in the fall of 1962 she took part in Cuban missile crisis operations. The destroyer was extensively modernized for anti-submarine duties under the FRAM I program during 1964-1965, shortly after a second redesignation again made her DD-883.

During late 1966 and early 1967 Newman K. Perry went to the Far East for a Vietnam War tour. After several months of service with the Seventh Fleet, including naval gunfire support and escort work, she completed a voyage around the World to return to the U.S. East Coast. In 1973 the ship was transferred to the Naval Reserve Force. She made a last Mediterranean cruise in that year, but thereafter her operations were in the Atlantic and the Caribbean. USS Newman K. Perry was decommissioned in late February 1981 and transferred to the Republic of Korea. Renamed Kyong Ki , she served with that nation's navy until 1998, when the fifty-three year old destroyer was placed out of service and scrapped.

USS Newman K. Perry was named in honor of Ensign Newman Kershaw Perry, who lost his life in the 21 July 1905 boiler explosion on USS Bennington .

This page features, and provides links to, all the views we have concerning USS Newman K. Perry (DD-883, later DDR-883 and DD-883).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Underway, probably soon after she was first commissioned in July 1945.
Note her tripod mainmast and other features fitting her for use as a radar picket destroyer.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 61KB 900 x 600 pixels

Seen from directly ahead, while she was at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, 26 July 1947.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 59KB 740 x 605 pixels

Seen from directly astern, while she was at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, 26 July 1947.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 77KB 740 x 625 pixels

USS Newman K. Perry (DD/DDR-883)

Underway, circa the late 1940s or early 1950s.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 138KB 900 x 715 pixels

Underway in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, 6 May 1969.
Photographed by PH3 Carl L. Hayes.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 85KB 900 x 625 pixels

Underway in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, 6 May 1969.
Photographed by PH3 Carl L. Hayes.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 85KB 900 x 625 pixels

Underway, circa the 1970s.
This photograph was received by the Naval Historical Center in March 1977.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 85KB 900 x 745 pixels

In addition to the images presented on these pages, the National Archives appears to hold other views of USS Newman K. Perry (DD/DDR-883). The following list features some of these images:

The images listed below are NOT in the Naval History and Heritage Command's collections.
DO NOT try to obtain them using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

The following photographs were taken while Newman K. Perry was in her original radar picket destroyer configuration, with pole foremast, tripod mainmast immediately in front of the after smokestack, 40mm gun mounts, and World War II era radar antennas:

The following photographs were taken after Newman K. Perry had been refitted with a tripod foremast with a SPS-6 air search radar, a SPS-8 height-finding radar antenna atop her after deckhouse and 3"/50 twin gun mounts:

The following photographs were taken after Newman K. Perry had undergone her FRAM I modernization, with new superstructure, second 5"/38 gun mount removed, ASROC launcher amidships and DASH facilities behind the after smokestack:

Reproductions of these images should be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system for pictures not held by the Naval History and Heritage Command.


USS Saidor -->

Originally named the Saltery Bay, she was renamed on 5 June 1944, was laid down on 29 September 1944 by Todd-Pacific Shipyards, Inc., Tacoma, Washington launched on 17 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Walter F. Boone and commissioned on 4 September 1945, Capt. A. P. Storrs in command.

Following shakedown off the United States west coast, she served at Pearl Harbor from 12 December 1945 to 20 March 1946. Sailing via the Panama Canal, she operated at Norfolk, Va., from 16 April to 22 April, before returning via the Panama Canal to the west coast. Departing San Diego on 6 May, Saidor arrived at Bikini on the 24th to serve as a photographic laboratory for the atomic bomb testing program, Operation Crossroads. She processed film, documenting the destructive power of atomic weapons on selected targets at various ranges, during the nuclear explosions of 1 July and 25 July. She departed Bikini on 4 August and returned to San Diego where she remained into 1947, when she began inactivation.

Saidor was decommissioned on 12 September 1947 and berthed with the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Diego. Reclassified CVHE-117 on 12 June 1955, and AKV-17 on 7 May 1959, she remained in the Reserve Fleet until 1 December 1970 when she was struck from the Navy list. She was sold to American Ship Dismantlers, Portland, Oreg., for scrapping on 22 October 1971.


Watch the video: The US Asiatic Fleet and the ABDA Command (January 2022).